Publications / Hungarian Energy Market Report
REKK Hungarian Energy Market Report 2011 Q4Published: 1 of December, 2011
Shrinking capacity on the Slovakian-Hungarian border: causes and consequences | Free Hungarian CO2 allocation schemes | Roadmap for the European electricity market integration | Major changes to come in Hungarian water utility services

Table of contents

Shrinking capacity on the Slovakian-Hungarian border: causes and consequences

The article discusses the capacity drop at the Slovakian-Hungarian cross-border auction in October, its effects on electricity wholesale markets and attempts to reveal its causes.

Author: Péter Kotek
Free Hungarian CO2 allocation schemes tuned to pumped-storage plants

Power plants may acquire CO2 quotas via auction only pursuant to the new ETS Directive that comes into force in 2013. Certain new Member States may be exempted from this requirement, providing free allocation to their power plants. Our study presents the details of derogation as implemented in Hungary, considering its possible impacts on the markets.

Roadmap for the European electricity market integration

Several news portals reported this summer the launch of a project to couple the Czech-Slovakian- Hungarian day-ahead electricity markets. Pursuant to the joint letter of intent signed on 30 May 2011, the Czech, Slovakian and Hungarian Transmission System Operators (CEPS, SEPS, MAVIR), Power Exchanges (OTE, OKTE, HUPX) and National Regulatory Authorities (ERU, URSO, HEO) set out to establish the interconnected day-ahead market by the second quarter of 2012, and, as far as possible, integrate the coupled markets in the Central Western European (CWE) region in the same year. The following paper endeavours to put this project into perspective in the European integration processes by presenting the institutional framework, the means and planned roadmap for interconnecting the European markets

Thirsty for regulationsMajor changes to come in Hungarian water utility services

The Hungarian water utility services experience major changes nowadays. A water utility act, to make up for decades without dedicated regulations, is being drafted. The sector is fragmented, with intricate ownership and property relations and a missing regulation to set the rules and constraints for competition, market and pricing. This article presents the factors that characterise and influence the sector, and outlines the specif- ics of water utility services, as one of the network industries in Hungary. We also take a brief outlook on solutions for market regulation in Europe, the discuss the conclusions that should practically be considered in the course of developing regulations and requirements for the sector

Author: László Csuport